Bias is everywhere. We deal with it constantly in our lives, every day. It’s so ever-present that we no longer realize it is happening in front of our eyes and so it is easily institutionalized, accepted as universal reality. A quick Google search reveals what we mean when we think of bias:

bi·as [bīəs]
  1. prejudice in favor of or against one thing, person, or group compared with another, usually in a way considered to be unfair.

As a Spaniard residing in the US for the past 8 years now, I have encountered bias on a regular basis, both internal and external. When I say internal bias I’m referring to my own assumptions and suppositions coming from one culture (mediterranean Spain) and being transplanted to a very different North American culture. Social values, gender norms, political stances, everything, and I do mean everything is very different. My first year in the US was such a big sychological clash that I didn’t know how to react, communicate, think for a good 2/3 months. I was expected to live in a culture that made little sense to me, communicate with people who I didn’t understand much of the time – and I’m not talking about my competence in the English language here; I’m referring to the ways in which people move, gesture non-verbally, manipulate vocal intonation, react to the use of precise expressions or linguistic constructions regardless of whether they are more or less formal… In short, this means I didn’t fit.

After the better part of half a year, I learned to emulate those structures that were universally accepted in the US, those behaviors that were expected of me by the regular Joes and Janes, and I started to be a logical subject in the North American cultural context. That didn’t mean I had no internal bias about much, much of what I saw and experimented. I used to think that the American lifestyle was way too capitalistic, way too consumerist and quite desensitized to much of the violence, inequality, extreme poverty and other problems that exist in western society. Eventually my Mediterranean bias, which honestly made me feel smarter and superior to some people, eroded as I better understood the American culture and how people just did many things differently than in Europe. I still hold some strong opinions – read: not bias – about how consumerist this society is, but I deem it no different than the consumerism in most of Europe at this point in history.

So, my internal bias declined over the years, especially after I met who ended up becoming my husband: my admiration for this person essentially forced a clash between bias and appreciation. How could I appreciate conduct in him that I deemed, well, illogical? This contradiction is very powerful and taught me to not just consider his background, his logic, his thought process before he behaved in X or Y way; but to identify much of the way a “regular” American thinks and reacts so I could foresee reactions to my own actions. This deeper understanding disintegrated my bias. I realized that much of what I thought normal, or correct, or expected, just didn’t work that way in his brain. Suddenly, I could see his perspective much more clearly and my bias was gone: I could see both my and his way of framing thoughts and immediately became much more open-minded (than I’d like to think I already, hopefully, was). What I thought of as bias now became a very obvious truth: it’s simply different.

When talking about external bias, the situation was very much different. This no longer implies my assuming how other cultures behave, but how others pre-suppose I act, think, behave or react. Specifically, in my case this means how Americans think this Spaniard fits in what they assume is his foreign cultural framework. I certainly do check some of the boxes that are expected: I talk really fast most of the time, I get really passionate about lots of topics in any debate, I’m certainly a bit loud and yes, I have lots of dark hair – which is annoying come shaving time. The problem, however, is in assuming that I fit in this foreign cultural framework. Clearly in 2007, freshly arrived in the US, my cultural values were predominantly Mediterranean; but after 8 years, I don’t feel Spanish anymore. That is not to say that I feel American either; what I feel is like a weird hybrid that has no clear place to call home as both Spain and the US represent that home. Both countries have become part of me, both cultures now conform my perspectives on life; so one could say that I’m, quite literally, culturally Spanish-American without being Hispanic as I’m ethnologically Caucasian.

Seeing this, it’s easy to understand how any biases I had in prior years have been pretty much disintegrated. That’s not to say that I’m not a biased person, but I do believe – maybe innocently – that if I have any prejudice it’s subconscious, as my growing as a person as part of two cultures over most of the past decade has made it impossible to not see bias when it happens. Elements that seemed logical in Spain now seem illogical to me, conducts that seemed strange in the US now look normal, and I’m able to see both the brilliance and stupidity of both cultures. In a word, I’ve trained myself – by necessity of pure survival and adaptation due to the life path I’ve chosen – to be alert to bias of any kind, to identify it, to analyze it, to understand it and, where applicable, to try to correct or right its path when it deviates from correctness – while acknowledging that swimming against the tide is sometimes pointless and one must learn to pick battles. In fact, this predisposition is most likely what drove me to do a PhD in literature and gender theory – plenty of gender bias in that combination.

This highly reflective passage brings me to the point I originally wanted to make, but felt would benefit from the exhaustive ~1000 word context I just provided. My main point, is journalistic bias. Of course, this is ever-present in many publications with different goals, but considering the topics this site tackles, I’m focusing on tech journalism bias. I have long complained about the clear, obvious, blatant Apple bias that occurs in the tech blogosphere and how most critics just shrug it off saying that it’s not bias, Apple products are just better. My criticism has long earned me an anti-Apple badge which I resent, as it is an absolutely untrue fact: while I do prefer Microsoft’s operating system, Apple products are perfectly respectable on their own. In fact, I’m typing this on a Macbook Air from 2011 that has Windows 10 installed onto it: that’s the most perfect representation of my preferences; great hardware with great software, at least in my opinion. There is nothing wrong with Apple products per se, but there’s something very wrong when the media is dominated with bias and refuses to recognize this reality other than jokingly referring to the Apple Distortion Field.

Let’s take a reputable site like Anandtech, for instance. This excellent site, which I regularly read and greatly respect, has reviewed both the Macbook Air and the Asus UX305. The reason why I mention this laptop is because a) it is a quite shameless rip-off the MBA design and b) I just bought it in order to phase out this old MBA I’m currently typing on. As I was reading reviews, I compared MBA reviews as the Asus is pretty much a Windows based Clone – hence why I like it. There are many differences, granted, but I want to focus on that institutionalized bias mentioned earlier that goes completely unnoticed to much of the population. First, let’s look at the MBA keyboard:


Now, let’s look at the UX305 keyboard:


Forget about the green keys in the Asus, it’s an addition for a specific country/language, those wouldn’t show in an English keyboard, but it’s the best picture I was able to find. Both keyboards are pretty much the same, correct? This is expected, as the Asus copies practically all aesthetic decision of the MBA. Now, let’s see what Anandtech reviewers had to say about each respective keyboard:

MBA: “The clickpad and backlit keyboard never give me any troubles either.”

UX305: “The keyboard layout is very standard, and the only thing that I dislike about the keyboard is that the power button is located on the top right corner above the backspace, and beside delete. Accidentally hitting it will power the device off of course, so it is not ideal… I think ASUS should move it, but they seem to like it there.”

OK. Let’s look at those keyboards again, now allow me to make the comparison a bit more salient:


Both keys have the exact same placement, yet somehow, this design decision is absolutely OK on the MBA review while the reviewer considers it highly problematic in the UX305, going as far as to wonder why Asus would insist on keeping that darn button in such an “illogical” bias. Well, the explanation is easy: Asus is keeping it there because Apple is keeping it there, because they’re literally copying the whole aesthetic. Somewhat inexplicably, what isn’t a problem in the MBA becomes a sore point in the UX305. Actually, there is an explanation: bias. Bias that is blatantly obvious to somebody like me, who has been forced by life circumstances and choices to see it, try to understand it and redirect it to a healthier perspective – or plainly a more practical one – where possible. This highly reputable online publication is clearly oblivious to the pretty extreme bias they’re showing and this is because their prejudice is not voluntary or by design. Anandtech doesn’t want to rain on Asus’ parade and elevate Apple products, there are plenty of sources to do that around. Anandtech is reputable for being objective, but here we can clearly see that they fail, and they fail in this instance because they’re being swept up by the aforementioned institutionalized bias. They’re fundamentally victims of a system of prejudice that has permeated most of our society and biased to assume negative values of any PC while attaching positive ones to Apple products. Hence why the exact same button on the exact same position is inconsequential on the Apple machine but a clear, obvious big problem in the Asus machine that seems a baffling design oversight to the reviewer.

Now, some will criticize these reviews were written by two different authors. I’d argue that is a moot point, as the website is viewed as one single publication and thus represents the view of them as a journalistic entity. In fact, it’s not a phenomenon only appreciable in the writing, it’s in the whole presentation of the product. This is how the MBA review shows the laptop’s keyboard (since they don’t talk about it because it’s fine, we can only see it in product pictures):

MBA key

Great, right? A regular, simple, professional product picture taken in a well lit environment. Now check how the UX305 keyboard is showcased in its review:

UX key

Huh. Well, I guess Asus wasn’t worthy of a) good lighting, b) a decent full frame or at least APSC camera like the MBA was. This is neither a professional or an acceptable picture for a product review in a site such as Anandtech. The picture is so bad, in fact, that whoever took it didn’t even bother to align the shot to not show a weirdly diagonal view of the keyboard, nor did they correct the very obvious lens distortion that makes the keyboard look bent/curved. Maybe they thought that cheap texture on the bottom made it look better…? But then again, who cares, right? It’s just a PC, it’s not worthy of the time and respect given to the greatness of the MBA.

This bias is so strong that the simple visual representation of the product reviewed is showing the authors’ conception of the device. The MBA is wonderful, the Asus is cheap. Read the reviews, and you’ll see that both reviews conclude that these are both, in fact, great products that you should consider buying. The institutionalized, subconscious bias that permeates both reviews, though, tells a different story: buy the slick MBA, consider the Asus, I guess, if you don’t mind cheap bent horrible laptops with power buttons that are great on Apple products but transform into the root of all evil in PCs.

There will be no judgment from me on this issue, as there is little point on evaluating the bias. The only thing I can do is point it out, make it obvious to others. I do this not just with tech – although it’s become an easy process in the past few years – I do this at work, with students, in real life, about politics, gender, you name it. As I said before, bias is everywhere. If you don’t realize it, you play into and perpetuate it. If you recognize it and don’t fight back, you play into and perpetuate it, but have and added responsibility towards equality that you have failed at. If you see, identify, understand, publicize and deconstruct it by showing others its flawed logic, then we’re on the right path to a better society. My specific example might be about a laptop, and I myself wouldn’t have noticed it had I not been in the very specific situation I was, but it applies to so much more in life, and we should strive to change such bias to a more open, objective and fair view of life.

Rain, absorb, grow

Lately it’s been quite rainy, which is probably due to the fact that August in Alabama is crazy humid. The air is full of water, the heat increases the pressure and bam. One, two, sometimes three storms in one day. There’s so much water falling around that it’s hardly surprising how fast everything is growing.

Just a few days ago we had a lunch with some friends. It was a nice restaurant where I was mostly interested in their creative light fixtures, some of the most original I’ve seen in a while:


After lunch we headed home and upon taking our dog out I noticed them. So. Many. Mushrooms. They were certainly not there a few days earlier, I would’ve noticed them. Huge mushrooms that showed up all of a sudden. So I took my gear and took a few stills, because soon there won’t be much growing going on once the “southern winter” (= mildly warm temperatures, not real cold per se) hits us.


I even made a little grasshopper friend!





I’m pretty sure you wouldn’t want to eat these… they’re growing on ground that is most likely full of chemicals just to look pretty. That said, seeing how alabamian humidity seems to help, I’m now intrigued to try to grow some food myself when we – hopefully – own a new house next year.



On other news, after agonizing over whether to buy a full frame A7 or keep my current APSC camera, I finally sold my SEL1855 kit-lens on eBay and bought a nice Sigma 30mm f/2.8 prime. Sure, the results won’t be as nice as FF, but I’ve decided the negatives outweigh the benefits in my case and staying APSC will yield much better value/outcomes in both the short and long run. Hopefully that f/2.8 (or my vintage 1976 Nikkor 50mm f/2) will help in isolating subjects further with nice creamy bokeh (all the pictures in this post are from the Nikon lens).

Updating… 100%

It’s been a while! 5 months to be exact. A lot has been happening in this time, which is one of the reasons why I haven’t posted anything in so long. So, I figured I should do an update post to bring everything up to speed. First of all, it’s been now 5+ months since I ordered a try-on of these Warby Parker Felton glasses and I still haven’t decided if I want to buy them or not. I like them but I have a usable pair, so I’m kind of waiting until they break to get new ones. But mine are 5 years old already. Maybe it’s time to buy a pair of glasses even if the old ones aren’t broken yet. I’m easily the most indecisive person on the planet.


EDUCATION – after 7 years of work, my PhD is finally, officially complete and since May 10th, I have the degree to prove it! It was a lot of hard work, studying, research and overall becoming an academic professional, but it feels good to have finally achieved this level. There’s also something to say about being the first Doctor in the family. Lots of sweat, tears, stress, joy, but mostly stress. Either way, it’s done, moving on. It’s now time to focus on enjoying teaching and working on my research articles whenever time allows. Obligatory degree shot:


And bonus shot of the actual graduation day. Extra points for Bryan and I being able to graduate and walk together. Not many married couples get to do that.


WORK – I’ve been working at the current institution for one year on a single-term contract. Graduating from the PhD certainly helped as it facilitated my getting a new position with a more stable 3-year renewable contract. That means Bryan and I get much more security laborally/financially and we can now start thinking about buying a house. Also, there’s extra cool points for being able to teach my courses but refer to myself as Dr. Xabier Granja in the syllabus!


LIFE – May/June/July were busy months. First we went to San Francisco for a wedding. Then we embarked to Spain for a couple weeks, where we were joined by most of our Chicago friends for what I call Wedding Part 2. To clarify, Bryan and I got married last year but since it was too difficult to get all our families together (and it seemed fairer to do an everybody-or-nobody kind of deal) we just celebrated with our closest friends, which I refer to as Wedding Part 1. So, exactly 1 year and 1 day later, we did Part 2 in Spain: if Part 1 was the ceremony in Chicago, Part 2 was the after-party in a wonderful bar on the top of a cliff that oversees a northern Spanish beach. About 40 people attended between family and friends, most of which won’t be able to make it to the American reception with 90 friends/family this August 14 in Chicago, which we’ll call Wedding Part 3. None of it makes sense… but somehow it all makes sense. All I can tell you is that it would certainly be cheaper to do 1 event on 1 day and 1 set of people, but although we certainly don’t get 3 weddings for the price of one, we do get 3 times the memories. As a bonus, here’s a shot from El Peñón in Sopelana, Spain:


TECHNOLOGY – finally, I’m abandoning WP. This surely comes as a surprise, but allow me to explain. 5 months ago I mentioned my purchase of a Nexus 4, my initial trial of Android 4.0. I loved the hardware, despised the software. Then, while I was too busy enjoying WP8.1 and dictating texts, reminders and calendar appointments to Cortana, this happened:


Suddenly, and without warning, Google finally found its design chops with L/5.0/Lollipop. The difference is striking: Android went from horrible to beautiful, from bland to colorful. Google established an excellent design philosophy, actually thought about what they were doing and found inspiration in the material properties of layers and light. The videos at are inspiring, but most of all this is thoughtful, elegant design just like I’ve always felt Windows Phone was. The problem is that WP had the design but not the platform; and now Google has the platform and the design. This, paired to the fact that Microsoft is scaling back on mobile hardware/software and that several apps that are important to me were actually eliminated from the store by their publishers, were the last nails on my WP obsession. Good design is worthless if it ceases to be functional. What’s more, just 2 years ago WP offered the best bang for buck with great phones for around $100. Nothing on Android could touch the fluidity, experience, design and affordability of a Lumia 620 or a 520.

In the following 24 months though, something happened: Microsoft stopped trying, probably too busy fixing the mess created with Windows 8 (not a bad decision considering how wonderful Windows 10 has turned out to be). The software ceased to have any new features since 8.1 and Cortana. There are many unacceptable stagnant, easy to fix software oversights: for example, the Battery Saver feature doesn’t auto-setup to kick in at 20%. Once you manually set it up, it won’t actually disable battery saver when you charge the phone next. What? This is a perfect example of how Microsoft has ignored software development on its own platform. Hardware doesn’t fare much better: low-end Lumia phones, once great bargains, started to be cheap. Not affordable, good deals. Just cheap. Cheap screen, cheap build, cheap CPU, inexcusable 512MB RAM in a 1GB world (justified by how well optimized the software was… which is true, but still not an excuse in 2014/2015). I had defended Windows Phones for years as better value when compared to Android, but now this is no longer the case and I’m glad to see Anandtech agrees with me:


And this is, in a nutshell, what happened. Microsoft stalled when they could absolutely not afford to do so as the 3rd ecosystem, while Google saw what Microsoft had been doing excellently in 2012 with low end phones and struck back: thus the creation of the Moto G and later, more impressively, the Moto E. I’m mostly interested in the latter: I’m a firm believer that the 1st gen of anything should always be skipped, it’s never worth your money. 2nd gen usually shows you what something can become and may even be great, 3rd gen is where things start rocking the market. Indeed, the 1st Moto E was disruptive but could safely be ignored as it sacrificed too much (ergonomics, screen, camera, CPU). 2nd gen Moto E? An impressive second take, one that you can easily evaluate yourselves comparing the innards. After my – granted, wonderful – hardware experience with the Lumia 635, which is cheap as chips, I’ve had a revelation: I don’t need a $400 phone. I don’t need a $300 phone. I could benefit from but don’t necessarily need a $200 phone. The Moto E 2nd gen LTE sells for $99 on Amazon right now and has mostly the same hardware as the lower end Moto G that costs $80 more dollars (SD410, 1GB RAM, IPS screen). So I bought one, because the value in the 2nd gen Moto E is unbeatable. Here’s a proud shot for posterity:


The value in this device is so great, actually, that I’m considering just buying Moto E’s every year, provided the upgraded models are worth the money and conserve the value. Think that sounds crazy? Now remember there’s millions of people that upgrade their iPhone every year: I can buy 6 Moto Es for the price of 1 iPhone. Annual upgrade cycle doesn’t sound so crazy in the context of the Moto E value (also it’s a great excuse to renew my mom and dad’s phones at a regular interval instead of the potatoes they’re using at the moment).

Finally, laptops. Earlier in the spring I sold my Surface 2. Why? Because Microsoft announced they were effectively abandoning the RT platform and moving onto Windows 10 on a full x86-64 architecture. Knowing this, I was lucky enough to sell it on eBay and recover %80 of the money I originally spent on it. Since then, I have been using Bryan’s old MacBook Air and the experience hasn’t been pretty. It’s not that getting used to the OS X ecosystem was challenging per se, instead… well, a picture is worth a thousand words:


Nope, that’s not an artistic wallpaper. That’s a heavily crashed LCD, and yup. That’s what I’ve been using for the past half year. Why? Because 10nm Intel Skylake CPUs are coming in October and they’re a pretty big deal, so I didn’t want to waste $700 before better hardware came along (let’s face it: 14nm Broadwell are kind of a joke and not much better than the previous Ivy Bridge. There’s a reason Broadwell is only going to have a 6 month market life, artificially extended to 9 months so Intel doesn’t lose millions in already produced chips). It is perhaps surprising that it hasn’t really been that bad to use this MacBook, now on Windows 10, in such a state. I mostly use the laptop for work, where I just plug it in to a 24″ monitor in my office. When I bring it to classes to take attendance, there’s a nice 40% of the lower-left screen area that’s crack free, so I can fit an Excel window there momentarily. It’s only been a real annoyance when traveling, since this laptop and my phone are really the only mobile devices I have at my disposal. What’s more, upon starting the Fall semester I’ll be getting an iPad 2 for faculty through the University, so the main pain point of this MacBook is removed; so much so that I’m even considering not getting a new laptop and keep using this. But I know I shouldn’t. I should own a normal working laptop. So I’ll probably buy one. And the front runner in that race is:


Asus UX305. Thinner and lighter than the MacBook Air. Same aluminum build. 9h of battery life. 1080p IPS screen (better than the current MacBook Air). 8GB RAM (what the what?) and 256GB SSD (again, w00t??). Free upgrade to Windows 10 (or by the time I buy it, it’ll probably ship with Windows 10 already). I admit it’s been really hard to not spend the miserly $699 that Asus asks for this machine, but I’m still waiting mostly because I hope/expect Asus will release a Skylake version of this laptop this fall. Maybe even cram in a biometric camera for Windows Hello. We’ll see, but this is the strongest contender by far.

And that’s it for now! Hopefully it won’t take me months to post something here again, but between teaching 5 courses, working on publishing an article and doing other research as a Faculty Fellow, it is likely my schedule will get complicated again. Even so, I should be pretty excited about that new laptop that I hope I won’t be able to avoid writing another post.

Until then.

Found one!


And its name is Lumia 635. The 735 was the real contender, the one I really wanted, but not at the $300+ price it released, that’s an insult. You may remember what I had to say about it a few months ago about its pros and cons:

635: Cheap. Non-unibody. Health tracking. LTE. VS Bad camera. No front camera. No ambient light sensor. Low-res screen.

So, why did I end up choosing this phone? Simple: the price dropped to a ridiculous $68 on December 20th and at that price, it was too good a bargain to pass. At this point a fully functioning modern smartphone for $68 wasn’t cheap, it was a steal and I’ve been enjoying it for the past 2 months. The non-unibody factor turned up to be no problem at all: this phone is crazy thin and light, whereas my 920 unibody was fat and heavy. The health tracking? Works beautifully and reminds me how little I walk everyday. The LTE is just as fast as it was on my 920. The 512MB RAM certainly isn’t as good as 1GB, but the phone works quite fast and feels speedy – similar to my 920 actually. I’m sure it’d be a bit more responsive with 1GB, but it’s not slow or feels sluggish by any means.


The negatives get a bit more annoying, mainly the camera. It’s crap, period. It takes passable pictures, but they’re all bad honestly (coming from the 920) and only salvageable for social network posting after I’ve done a quick edit on Photoshop express, even pictures taken in daylight are dull. At least having a bad camera on my phone has rekindled my use of my Sony NEX 5N, so there’s some gain to be had here. Not having a front camera isn’t a problem %99 of the time – I’m not one to take selfies, but hey there’s always those couple times when you want to get a small group shot and it’s just easier seeing the screen… no biggie though. I can turn the phone around to use the main camera and the Lumia selfie app will beep (like crazy) to indicate we’re in the picture. Not perfect, but kinda works. For $68, I’ll put up with it. The lack of ambient sensor is something I thought would really annoy me… not so, honestly. I keep the screen at medium and it’s totally fine 90% of the day. When it’s bright and sunny outside, I switch it to High (I keep the setting on the action center so it’s easy to get to). What’s an improvement, actually, is in bed at night: my 920 turned the brightness down but it was always a bit too bright to be comfortable. With the 635 I can actually specify how low I want the Low level to be (or the mid, or the high) so I turned it real low and its now a pleasure to use in a pitch dark room, or on a car ride at night.

Talking about the screen – it’s beautiful. Sure, it’s no longer 768p like the 920 and that shows, I’m not going to lie: it’s fuzzier and less detailed. It’s also not going at 60hz like the 920’s screen. But hey, it’s still an IPS panel with ClearBlack, contrast is great and the color are actually better than what I was seeing on the 920. Well, at least they look better, deeper and richer to me. Don’t take my word for it, let’s compare (*Note: some shots show heavy fringing on the 635 – this is because the camera is picking up the pixel pattern and since it can resolve the detail it shows that distortion, but that’s not visible at all in real life):

DSC02446 DSC02448 DSC02449 DSC02450 DSC02451 DSC02452 DSC02453 DSC02455  DSC02458

Side by side, the 920 looks better overall, but remember: I paid $250 for the 920 refurbished (which was already cheap) whereas the 635 cost $68, new. Locked to T-Mobile, sure, but just last week I called and they got my phone unlocked with no problem at all, so I’ll be able to use it when my husband and I fly to Spain this summer – and eventually give this phone to my mom for good while I’ll renew to a Windows 10 phone. So, essentially, it’s a liberated phone for $68. Beat that value, iPhone/any-Android-ever. I was never a huge fan of the original matte white case T-Mobile included so I spent $6 and got this blue case on eBay.

So there you have it: a good phone for anybody who just wants a nice, decent smartphone for normal use. It’s a stopgap for me as I really want a better camera and an AMOLED screen once Windows 10 phones are released, but it’s a perfectly fine phone that, for the price, is an amazing value.

Looking for a new phone…

I’ve had 4 phones in the past 4 years:

– Samsung Focus in 2011, which was my gateway to try Windows Phone.
– Nexus 4 in late 2012, which was my gateway to try Android 4 (and I gave the Focus to my mom as her 1st smartphone).
– Lumia 620 in mid-2013, after I decided I hated Android and missed Windows Phone.
– Lumia 920 in early 2014 after I gave the 620 to my mom (who desperately needed to ditch WP7 and move on to WP8).

The first three phones were always temporary. I was trying systems, seeing what I liked (I had had an iPod Touch with iOS 4 before the Focus so I knew that system well already) and what I did not. With the occasional fall, my usually not-too-useless hands did a good job at not dropping these puppies too much. They all survived well, with some nicks in the back or sides but mostly fine. And then I decided to get serious with Windows Phone and buy a 920. It had a great camera, great screen, 1GB RAM, fast CPU… I was excited. The happiness has lasted for 6 months in which I enjoyed WP8, the creation of the Dev Preview program and finally the incredible quality jump that is WP8.1 with Cortana and Cyan firmware. I was certain I was going to keep using this phone for 1-2 years, easily, since I knew it would be upgradeable to WP9 when Threshold becomes official in Spring 2015. And then… it happened.


Well, of course. The phones I really didn’t care about that much, the cheapo ones that I didn’t really make much effort to protect because I could just get new ones from Amazon immediately, those survived perfectly. The one I was intending to keep for 2 years? That’s when I’ve lost my “virgin” status in phone cracking. What’s hilarious is the way it happened: while my cheaper phones fell out of my hands and into the ground and lived to tell the tale, I innocently left my 920 on a bathroom’s sink surface. Well, apparently that darn thing wasn’t as perfectly perpendicular against the ground as it seemed, and exactly 20 seconds after I let the phone rest, I heard a SMACK! I had no idea what the noise was, what could’ve caused it, until I saw the phone, screen down, laying on the bathroom’s tiled floor. That’s impossible, I thought, I left it securely on that flat surface, it couldn’t have slipped unless a ghost pushed it. I lifted the poor 920 and there it was: a glorious mega-crack extending through the upper left corner. Upon further examination, I realized that this crack was exacerbated by a previous tiny, microscopic nick caused by a light drop months ago. This tiny nick evidently created a weak spot and when the phone smashed onto the ground that weak point surrendered to the forces imposed by gravity, originating the huge crack that expanded through the upper left area of the screen.

Incredulous, I inspected the bathroom surface I had left the 920 on: no water to facilitate phone-suicide, but upon lowering my eye-point I noticed the damn thing was indeed not fully flat. It had just the slightest curvature to it towards the edges, precipitating my 920 early demise. I cursed bathroom designers everywhere and after my initial denial and anger phases, bargaining kicked in to accept the loss and I raced to acceptance (I skipped depression because, let’s face it, it’s just a phone and I have a life, so this isn’t such a huge deal. Huge enough to make me write a blog post about it to entertain myself, though). I can’t avoid the thought that, had this phone not been a unibody design, it would have survived without a hitch: non-unibody frames tend to “shatter” upon impact, opening up the case and separating the case, battery and the rest of the phone. Much, I repeat, much of the impact energy is released on this separation process, minimizing damage to all three components. Unibody designs don’t have this advantage: on the contrary, the impact energy travels from the shock point through the body frame and cannot be released anywhere, thus exacerbating the pressure on the body’s materials and releasing un-suppressed energy in the only way it can: by breaking material for energy to be let out. Hence the huge crack in my 920, facilitated by the tiniest nick that created a weak point. Had this been my 620, it would have shattered in 3, I would have put all three parts together again and voila, ready to go without a scratch.

This is why I tend to prefer non-unibody phones. Besides, there is the matter of price: a 620 would cost about a third of a 920. However, there are other extras: the 920’s camera is brilliantly excellent and I’m now spoiled as I’ve gotten used to having a great camera in my pocket at all times with which I can instantly share through LTE. The 620 had no such great camera nor LTE (the latter I can live without, though).

So, now, I’m faced with a choice: upgrade sooner than I had planned or keep using the cracked 920 – it is completely, perfectly functional, after all, but the cracked area is quite annoying as it obscures a good %15 of the screen. There are now three considerations: price, camera and construction. Queue the announcements of the 730 and 830 just 3 weeks ago and the decision making process gets quite muddy:

920: Expensive. LTE. Great camera.                                        VS      Unibody. Thick, heavy, old. No health tracking.

635: Cheap. Non-unibody. Health tracking. LTE.                       VS      Bad camera. No front camera. No ambient light sensor. Low-res screen.

735: Semi-unibody. AMOLED screen. LTE. Decent camera.        VS      Price? Health tracking?

830: Health tracking. LTE. Great camera.                                 VS     Unibody. Price? Health tracking?

So, the decision seems to be centered around the 635 and the 735 as they have the least compromises. The 635 is quite hampered in the camera and sensor departments… but the thing is literally $99. With no contract. That’s no money, at all.  The 735 has a high-res AMOLED screen which pretty much guarantees it’ll be beautiful to look at with great color and deep blacks. It has 2 decent cameras, front and back. LTE. The only question is, how much will it cost? If it releases at around $250 this would be a no brainer as an unlocked device. If released through Tmobile as no-contract, $200 is the max I’d pay (keep in mind the 635 is going for 99 as no-contract so it’s hard to justify more than $100 price difference). Any more than that and we have a problem: if the 735 gets closer to $300, then a) this is unjustifiably expensive for a mid-low range device using a mere Snapdragon 400 and b) at that price, the 635 becomes 1/3 of the price and one has to seriously evaluate if the shortcomings are such a big deal for the ridiculous $99 price.

So, that’s the quandary I find myself in right now. Not wanting to upgrade but not wanting to use a cracked phone, not being able to decide on what would be an appropriate upgrade path. Anybody cares to weigh in? I even made mockups for both phones to see how they’d look (seems like I’ve settled on the orange models). Which one do you like best?

Lumia 635

Lumia 635

Lumia 735

Lumia 735

Fixing Surface for its third incarnation

This week some interesting news came out about the 3 different SKUs that Windows 9/Threshold will apparently have. What we’ll get is:

1) Desktop version with an actual desktop and a modern/win32 hybrid Start menu.

2) Desktop-less Mobile version that will run on all ARM hardware (both phones and tablets) and maybe on Intel Atom CPUs.

3) Business version that might allow disabling the modern (by modern I’m referring to the WinRT framework, but I’ll keep calling it modern to avoid WinRT and Windows RT confusions) environment completely.

This is good news all around. For starters, mobile users have absolutely no need for the desktop: on a 10″ device, the desktop is awful, targets are too tiny to touch with fingers and mousing around isn’t very comfortable in such limited real state. In the same vein, desktop users can use modern but it’s not a very comfortable experience in the framework’s rough state these days. Many people shout to the winds about how horrible modern is for the future, not realizing their blindness: a UI framework is never a static structure, it adapts and changes to improve with time and experience. Modern is literally 2 years old: remember how awful win32 was in the 80s? Took them until 1995 to make it something great. We face the same scenario with modern and its WinRT language: it’s inadequate and weak now, but give it a few years and it’ll start picking up APIs, libraries, functionality. It will most assuredly replace win32 at some point, just not anytime soon. I find it ridiculous that people decry and condemn a 2 year old piece of software in this instant-gratification society spoiled by the past decade of amazingly lucky constant successes. The iPod-iPhone-iPad 1-2-3 punch is an anomaly in technology history, an incredibly fortunate one for Apple and the rest of the market. Mark my words: this is not going to happen again for a long time. These huge market impacts come about once every decade, we’ve had 3 in that time period. The slowdown has already started – noticed anything breaking released since the iPad was launched? Nope. Get used to it. Great things normally take time, and WinRT needs time to become great. And no, the smartwatch is not the next big thing.

So, what does this have to do with Surface?

Plenty, specially after the recent news of the 3 Threshold SKUs. For the sake of brevity, I’ll focus only on the mobile release that will run on any ARM CPU. This version is the fusion of Windows Phone and Windows RT we’ve been hearing about for months. Some call this the death of RT (playing into the aforementioned inadequacy cry) but that’s missing the point. Microsoft now has 3 platforms to maintain: Phone, RT and x86-64, which is unnecessarily excessive. x86-64 will remain and Phone and RT will merge. This is no death for any of the platforms, I like to think of it as a rebirth: while their names might fade away, the actual code will be fused bringing the best of WP and RT together. That means both app libraries will combine and we’ll also get Cortana, notification system and a big etc. Since RT is big and heavy just like the x86-64 version, it makes more sense that the main base will be WP to which all RT goodness will be added, then both will be enhanced once fused as 1 (a 32GB tablet would now have 30GB of free space instead of the current 14 or so). Also, this would mean that even a sub-par hardware configuration like my Surface (1st gen) would work quite well, as it’s still a quad core ARM CPU with 2gb of RAM: barely minimal for RT but plenty to run a WP/RT lighter OS. But I digress. This fused SKU can breathe renewed life into Surface amplifying its app store, making the OS lighter and faster and getting rid of the unnecessary desktop in hybrids. This, however, can only happen once the modern version of Office is ready for release, meanwhile Microsoft can’t take away the one feature that makes Surface special (literally why consumers like me bought the machine, because 99% of my work consists of Word, Excel and Powerpoint).

The new hybrid OS would however imply changes to the Surface philosophy. While both the ARM and x86-64 versions would be one Windows 9, the market targets will be very different, bringing to memory the days when business and consumer Windows were a big differentiator. Many have asked for an Atom based Surface but I suspect this has not yet happened due to market tension: Microsoft has acknowledged they do not intend to compete with OEMs, so I expect for them to keep the Surface line a premium one with Core CPUs and higher price tags. This also brings into question other recent rumors of Microsoft abandoning Surface for its recently acquired Lumia brand. Now, what I consider most logical here is that the mobile SKU of 9, based on ARM CPUs, would be used in Lumia devices, both phones and tablets while the x86-64 variant would remain in the Surface Pro line. This would indeed do away with the Surface (on ARM) line, but then again it’s been quite a market flop. The Pro line, in comparison, has been quite the success, especially with the recent Surface Pro 3 that has delighted reviewers everywhere. It would make good branding sense to keep Surface just as a Pro line, for people who want to do serious work, and use the Lumia brand for ARM based hardware: phones and tablets for play and some work (hence the need for the modern version of Office).

With that said, what does a Surface 3 even look like? First of all, the name: I don’t see Microsoft doing this but it wouldn’t be too far fetched that they’d consolidate ARM phones and tablets under the Lumia branding, calling the Surface 3 something like the Microsoft Lumia 1 (as they seem pretty obsessed with One branding lately), it wouldn’t get confused with the phone model numbers in the hundreds and thousands. I’d keep the main characteristics of the non-pro Surface and Lumia aesthetic: from Surface I’d keep the kickstand (full flex inherited from SP3) with the Windows button on the right side, a 3:2 screen that fits the same chassis as S1 and S2 so the current Type covers are still usable. From Lumia I’d keep the colors: make the tablets available in a bunch of different colors, and boom, you have a successful Lumia/Surface hybrid that feels like a more fun, smaller, tablety version of Surface Pro which is designed for consumption while letting you work lightly on modern Office. For illustration:

Surface 2:


surface 22Lumia 1:


Surface 3 mockup2That’s how I see MS evolving: Lumia phones and tablets using mobile Threshold SKU fusing WP/RT, Surface Pro tablets using x86-64. The phones don’t need to change much, just keep evolving. Lumia tablets that replace ARM Surfaces would reflect Lumia and Surface Pro qualities (playful, colorful, consumption-oriented, light work capable, 3:2 screen, button on side) while Surface Pros would remain where they have succeeded, in the professional/business market. Add to this that with Threshold all apps will use mostly the same codebase and you have the write-once-use-everywhere dream of universal apps come true, both stores combine to have around 450,000 apps that you can use in your phone, tablet or desktop. Not only is this a great direction for Windows in general, but it’ll be a great push for both the phones and tablets, besides propelling the WinRT framework overall. As for how the WP/RT merge will look like? I wouldn’t mind it being a mixture of WP/RT user interfaces while at the same time distancing themselves from the Windows modern aesthetic so the regular consumer knows it’s no longer Windows 8.x but something different:


This mockup, however, seems like it won’t be the case. We’ve heard that the start screen is most likely going away for everyone, desktop and tablet users, to be replaced by a hybrid start menu kind of thing that can act as a more-or-less full screen expandable start menu of sorts. In my mind, this is what that means to combine both approaches in a bid to appease touch and desktop users:

3 avec screem

This seems like a sensible combination. The principles of the start screen, flexibility, customization, touch convenience and grouping are preserved, while desktop users are not booted to a different experience. Since many users hate occluding what’s in the desktop, well, they probably wouldn’t populate their hybrid start menu as much as I did, although parts of the desktop are still visible here. Microsoft would be wise to provide optional transparency controls though, it can never hurt them to give users more choice if occluding what’s behind the start menu bothers them so much. These kind of changes can work. Now they need proper execution, branding, marketing and software support. Get to it Microsoft.


HAL #43 – Crispy kale chips

Kale is one of my favorite veggies. It is leaf based – I’ve always liked leaves better than flowers – it is green (and dark green at that) which is a color I love and it is full of good stuff for you: beta-carotene, vitamins K & C, calcium and other elements that actually repair your DNA aiding to prevent cancer. It also lowers cholesterol! The only downfall is its strong taste when raw, which is not to everybody’s liking. Usually I use kale as part of a juice that I regularly make for dinner but there is a great easy way to make chips out of it that I learned from the amazing Mindfoodness:

First off – grab some nice looking kale!

Second – chop the leafy parts with your hands or a knife to separate them from the stem. Whether you want bigger or smaller chips is up to you, I tend to cut them medium sized.

Remember – don’t throw away the stems! Even without leaves they still have nutrients so you can still add these to a veggie/fruit juice.

Third – mix the kale leaves with no more than 2 spoons of extra virgin olive oil: the goal is not to make them super oily but just lightly coat them so they’ll cook nicely in the oven. Sprinkle some salt too to improve the taste.

Fourth – Have your oven pre-heated to 350F and leave the kale cooking for no more than 15 minutes (depending on your oven they could be done sooner, I’d check after 10min to be safe).

Done! – Enjoy the healthy, crispy and tasty kale chips that come out of the oven!